Tag Archive for Speaking

Year in Review for 2015 and Future Goals for 2016

AdobeStock_96432559This has been another spectacular year in the SQL world. Unfortunately, I can’t find my list of goals, so I’ll have to wing it. I can say, that I have had some unexpected surprises this year.


Level up!
  1. I have two favorite activities in the SQL world. One of which is speaking. This year I presented 14 times to over 1300 people. I spoke at two conferences, one of which was my second year at PASS Summit in Seattle. I spoke at 6 user groups, one of which was presented remotely in Australia. I also spoke at 5 SQL Saturday’s and once for Pragmatic Works.
  2. My second favorite activity is writing. This year, I started writing for SQL Server Central. I wrote two articles for them, which had more than 20K views. I have my third post scheduled for Jan 4th/5th, so keep your eyes open for it. I also had 17 blog posts on my website. My metrics for the year were off the wall. An 82 % increase in sessions, a 403 % increase in session duration, a 97 % increase in page views (that’s 23K page views!), and my favorite, 52% increase in Users, which yields 9.5K users. Thanks viewers!
  3. I created my meet and greet list for PASS Summit and I was able to meet most of the people on my list. Some of them I knew through conversing on Twitter, like Pinal Dave. I (finally) had an opportunity to give Buck Woody a big hug too. I also met some people that I didn’t know: Wawrick Rudd, Mellisa Lord, Michael Upton, Denis Horner, and many more.
  4. This is my second year co-leading our local BI user group with Rob Hatton.
  5. I had the honor of being part of the Friends of Red Gate program again. This is my third year.
  6. My husband granted me my wish for our 20th wedding anniversary of going on my second SQL Cruise in the Caribbean AND he went with me on it. When I mentioned I had been on a SQL Cruise in my interview for my current job, they thought I was kidding. If you have never heard of SQL Cruise, I highly recommend checking it out. There is no where else you can get 6 amazing instructors for 30 students. Those speakers are trapped on a ship with you, so you can actually spend time with them over drinks or dinner asking them any question you want. I had that opportunity with Jes Borland, Grant Fritchey, Kevin Kline, David Klee, Tim Ford, and Amy Ford.
I have some new goals for 2016 as well
  1. I was hoping to speak at least once a month again, but after looking at 2014 and 2015 it will be easy to speak an average of twice a month. I have a goal of of 9 SQL Saturdays. Hopefully, I will get another opportunity to speak at PASS Summit. And I plan on speaking over the inter-webs as many times as I can. Here are some of the speaking engagements, I already have planned.
    1. SQL Saturday 461 in Austin, TX, Janurary 30th, 2016.
    2. Pragmatic Works on Feburary 9th.
    3. Profession Development Virtual Chapter in March.
    4. SQL Saturday 497 in Huntington Beach, CA April 02, 2016.
    5. DBA Fundamentals Downunder Virtual Chapter in May.
    6. All the others will slowly appear on my Speaking Engagements page.
  2. I plan to continue writing for my own blog and for SQL Server Central with a goal of one post each month for each site. That is a lofty goal for me since almost all my writing is done on Sunday’s, in a little coffee shop with my daughter. (I also spend that time writing abstracts.) Wish me luck!
  3. I’ve enjoyed speaking on SSRS, but I’m going to change it up. I’ll continue speaking on writing better SQL, but I’m also going to take up another SQL subject. Stay tuned!
  4. I’ll continue co-leading our local BI user group.
  5. I plan on mentoring one of my colleagues, Ly Nguyen. He has a goal of becoming a DBA or a Database Developer. I’m super excited about this, since he is eager to learn.
  6. This next year, I want to spend more time on forums, helping others.
  7. Hopefully, I’ll be part of Friends of Red Gate for another year.
Stretch goals

I think it’s a good idea to have some stretch goals to help push yourself past your comfort zone. Here is mine.

  1. Create a full day session to present. This seems so overwhelming, but I was a Microsoft Trainer for two years at the beginning of my career, so I know it’s possible.
  2. Speak (physically) in another country. My Australian friends, have been pushing encouraging me to speak in Melbourn, AU. I’m not sure if it will be possible, since my oldest daughter will be attending college next year, and most of my speaking money will be redirected to her tuition. If I accomplish the first of my stretch goals, then this might be possible.
  3. Writing another book. This is a big commitment of time. The good news is, my family is willing to support me in this endeavor. This is great, since they would hardly see me, except at dinner, until the project was completed.
I want to thank…

There is no way I could accomplish what I do without the support of friends and family. Here is this year’s shout out.

  1. My husband is definitely number one on this list. Whenever I have a really bad week, or I get bummed out about something, his first question is, “When is your next SQL Saturday”? Also, he is encouraging me to speak and write until my heart’s content.
  2. I always say, my first language is SQL and my second language is English. Luckily I have my daughter Victoria to help with my grammar and spelling. She is now one of my official editors and will continue to be my editor through college.
  3. Ben McNamara is my second editor. While Victoria can catch my English mistakes, Ben can catch the technical ones. He is also one of my touchstones when I get nervous about speaking or am taking criticism personally.
  4. Jes Borland, Chris Yates, Julie Koesmarno, and Nghi Nguyen are my other touchstones in my life. They are great at keeping me grounded.
  5. Steve Jones asked me to write for SQL Server Central and I was very honored. He also has the most relaxed manner that I wish I had. I can learn how to be more laid back from him, since I see him at SQL Saturdays and at Summit.
  6. I want to thank you, my readers and those that attend my presentations. Without you, I wouldn’t be having any fun.
Now it’s your turn.

My question to you is, what are your technical goals for 2016? Do you have some achievable goals and some stretch goals? Here are some ideas.

  • Start a blog. Most people start writing a blog for themselves, to remember how to do something in the future.
  • Start speaking. This can be very scary, but there is always someone out there who needs to know what you know. It can be as simple as rewriting a cursor or as complex as setting up replications.
  • Mentoring. Speaking might be too scary, so instead take someone under wing. Not only can you mentor them in a technical capacity, but you can also mentor them in how to deal with different parts of a team or how to gather requirements.
  • Volunteering: Every organization that is run by volunteers, needs more volunteers. You can help out at your local SQL Saturday or at PASS Summit to name a couple of places. (I volunteered at Summit this year. I directed people to the WIT lunch or to the normal lunch. I had a blast!) You can also volunteer at local community centers that have programming classes for kids. We need to help encourage the next generation.

My Eleven Day PASS Summit 15 Experience

“STUEWE!” This is how I knew PASS Summit was about to begin. I was walking to the Friday night SQL Saturday Portland speaker dinner, prior to PASS Summit, when I heard my name being called, well, yelled. Since it was already dark, it took a minute to spot the black SUV with Mike Fal hanging out the window waving at me.

But wait, that is not when my Eleven Day Summit Experience started.

Day One – Thursday

It actually started on Thursday before Summit at LAX. I was there bright and early to pick up two of my Australian friends, Martin Cairney and Ben McNamara, who would be traveling with me to Portland and then on to Seattle. Despite the 14 hour flight, they wanted to go see the Endeavor space shuttle at the California Science Center in LA.


Day Two – Friday

Friday was spent flying to Portland where we would be attending SQL Saturday Portland. We stayed in an Air B & B house. This is a great way to save some money for lodging and to feel like you’re at home. There is always a coffee machine with decent coffee and the best…no rambunctious kids on the floor above you. WIN!

Friday night, we attended a wonderful speaker dinner (This is when Mike Fal yelled my name out a window of an SUV). Speaker dinners are always fun to attend. You get to catch up with friends and make new ones. Portland is always a bit special, because it’s full of speakers from around the world who made a little extra time to speak at a community event before PASS Summit.

After dinner, we found an amazing restaurant. It had the most scrumptious gluten free bread. I think it was made of clouds.


Day Three – Saturday

Saturday was spent at one of my favorite SQL Saturdays. Ok, I’ll be honest. ALL SQL Saturdays are my favorite. It’s a great time to do a little extra networking, get to see SQL Family, and meet new people in the community. I also love speaking and that is what I did in Portland. I spoke on SSRS.

2015 PASS Summit12

I was able to attend several wonderful sessions. My favorite was given by Julie Koesmarno and Cindy Gross: Moving beyond Unconscious Bias. I really liked their approach to this topic. Throughout the presentation, they strongly emphasized that we are all good people.

They spoke about how everyone categorizes everything in our lives, but sometimes we have a bias in our categorization, an unconscious bias that we are unaware of. They told us about a study by Harvard called the Implicit Association test, which tests how we categorize various topics. Julie and Cindy then showed us a video of Allen Alda taking the Harvard test. I strongly recommend learning about unconscious bias.

No Portland trip is complete without going to my two favorite places in the evening. We put our names in for our two hour wait at the Multnomah Whiskey Library, and then we headed over to Cassidy’s. They have great food and AMAZING bacon. I ordered enough bacon for all sixteen of us. (And there was much rejoicing). Afterwards we went to the Whiskey Library, where I was finally able to try some Scapa Scotch. I really liked it (Thanks for the recommendation Grant!).2015 PASS Summit13

Day Four – Sunday

One of the cheapest ways to get from Portland to Seattle is the train. When we bought our tickets, they were around $25. Little did we know it would be an unexpectedly amazing day. My friend, Ted Stathakis, was really looking forward to this day too. He loves trains; neither of us realized how amazing it would be.

Last year, there were only five of us on the train. Martin Cairney and I spent the majority of the trip troubleshooting a problem with my VM. Not this time. This time it was completely non-technical. There were sixteen of us in our car, and two who (foolishly) purchased tickets in a nicer car. Why do I say foolishly? Well, we were having so much fun, that they spent the majority of the trip in our car…eating our Voodoo Donuts. Next time, I think they will buy the general tickets. Next time, I’m also going to try getting the WHOLE car too. So if you want to ride with us, keep an eye out for a post from me in the summer.

2015 PASS Summit4

For more details on the fun we had, go look up the twitter handle #SQLTrain.

Day Five – Monday

Monday was a red day. Red Gate day that is. Red Gate puts on a free event called SQL in the City. They have put it on each year on the Monday before the PASS Summit for several years now. They bring quite a few people from the UK to talk about their tools, and they have amazing presentation. This year, they went with a common theme: Continuous Integration. I participated in the Lightening Talks. I spoke on how to use their DLM Dashboard. This is a great tool that keeps an eye on the databases you connect to the DLM dashboard. You can monitor who modified the database and which scripts they ran on the database. Did I mention this is a free tool?

2015 PASS Summit5

Monday night is the annual Networking dinner put on by Steve Jones and Andy Warren. This is a “must attend” event. Why? It’s all about networking and integrating 1st timers into the community. This year, a bunch of us crammed into a booth with four 1st timers. At least two were from Europe. I enjoyed getting to know them and they enjoyed being introduced to all the people that came by our table to say hi.

Note: Remember, networking isn’t just about talking tech. It’s about building relationships so that you can ask technical questions in the future. If you need ideas on how to meet people, take a look at my blog post, Top Ten Ways To Create Your Meet and Greet List For Summit.

Day Six – Tuesday

Tuesday was a relaxing day before the busyness of Summit. I started the day off with breakfast with Chris Yates. This is a rare pleasure. Chris and I met through the SQL Community on Twitter. We now blog together occasionally and I speak at the SQL Saturday in his hometown.

Before I took time to prep for my Wednesday morning presentation, my apartment mates and I went to the Starbucks where they roast all of their coffee beans. I had my first french press, and, I must say, I’m hooked. 2015 PASS Summit2-001

After I was done with my presentation preparation, it was time for the opening event for PASS Summit. This is a whirlwind event. I feel like a butterfly, fluttering from conversation to conversation. This year, I felt like a match maker too. I had three people from my company attending with me. I haven’t had that happen since the mid 90s! I enjoyed introducing them to a number of people.

I also did something different. I went looking for the lone 1st timers. The wallflowers who don’t know who to talk to. I found one. He was eating by himself near a wall, watching everyone by himself. I went up to him, introduced myself, and got to know him. I then asked if there was someone he wanted to meet. He wanted to meet Pinal Dave from India. Pinal and I know of each other, but we’ve never had the pleasure of shaking each other’s hands. So that’s what we did. Luckily, Pinal was standing nearby. Pinal and I finally shook hands, and I introduced him to the 1st timer. That made me very happy. Win!

2015 PASS Summit14

Day Seven – Wednesday

This was my day <deep breaths inserted here>. I was first up to bat <deep breaths inserted here>. I’m nervous as I walk to my room. I see my room and I get calmer. I climb up on the stage and I get calmer. I get my laptop set up and I’m ready to go. Boom.

As you’ve probably noticed, I really believe in networking. My class filled up with plenty of time to spare before the presentation, so I did the same thing I did last year. I had everyone stand up and introduce themselves to their neighbors. I stood on stage with a huge grin on my face, then I stepped off stage and introduced myself to people in the front row.

200 hundred people came to hear my presentation on Sophisticated Techniques in SSRS. I enjoyed every minute of the session. We did have a couple of exciting moments in class though. There was a laptop on the table (not mine) that started beeping. I thoroughly enjoyed slamming nicely shutting the laptop lid. There was also a crash of dishes behind me in the hallway. I said “Opa!” in my head and kept on presenting.

2015 PASS Summit15

With my presentation done, I was able to enjoy classes the rest of the conference.

One class I took was not found in a classroom, but on the edge of a planter on the ground floor. I started talking with this guy (sorry I can’t recall his name, but he was awesome). He was telling me how he had submitted his session, but wasn’t selected. After he told me his topic, I told him I would have taken his class. His presentation was right up my alley. So he asked if I would like to see it. I said yes and we had a wonderful one-on-one discussion, complete with demos on his laptop. Right there. On the edge of a planter. It was my favorite class. THAT is one the many special things about PASS Summit.

One of the things I was really happy about this year was the change in how special diets were handled. In the past, they have always messed up my meals. I have a lot of food sensitivities, so I understand it’s difficult to accommodate my diet, but I still need to eat. This year, they had our names on our meals, and they had the more common special requests handled in the regular food line. (Thank you)

Day Eight – Thursday

I was invited again to live-blog the keynote on Thursday. You can see my comments here. I was very sad to hear that this would be the last keynote for PASS Summit given by David DeWitt and Rimma Nehme. I’m happy that I’ve been able to see two of their keynotes.

2015 PASS Summit Notes1

Before lunch, I thoroughly enjoyed directing people to lunch (I’ll tell you a secret. I think I enjoyed twirling my sign a little too much. Open-mouthed smile).

Thursday is the Women In Technology Day (WIT). WIT puts on a great lunch, and I was in the perfect place to direct people to the regular lunch and the WIT lunch. One of the traditions of WIT day is for men and women to wear kilts. This tradition was started by Grant Fritchey many years ago. This was my fourth year participating.

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Day Nine – Friday

Friday is full of sessions and bitter sweet goodbyes. Now, I don’t want you to think I only had fun this week. I did attend sessions. I have proof. I also took notes.

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… And I had fun.


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Summit is not complete without at least one night hanging out with Jason Strate at Bush Garden participating in SQL Karaoke. I was super happy to make it there multiple times this year. Last year, I wasn’t able to go at all due to all the commitments I had at Summit.

2015 PASS Summit8

Day Ten – Saturday

Saturday was a vacation day. I spent the day with my Australian friends. These are friends that I’ve made through Summit. I even worked with a some of them for a few months. In the evening, Julie Koesmarno and I threw a dinner party for a few of our friends who were still in town. We were even able to invite some friends we met this year.

2015 PASS Summit19-001

Day Eleven – Sunday

Sunday I had to come back to reality on my flight home. While I had an amazing time in Seattle speaking, learning, networking, and reconnecting, I was happy to see my family and they were happy to see me.


Questions Answered From Presentation: SSRS 101 Creating Reports for Diagnostic Data

On Tuesday, July 7th, 2015, I had the privilege of speaking for the DBA Fundamentals Virtual Chapter. Thanks to the 375 who attended and to all who will be watching the recording. While I can’t read the comments during my presentation (way too distracting), I did enjoy reading the questions and comments that were sent to me. Below you will find answers to the questions I was sent.

Questions Answered

1. Are you talking about SSRS 2016 or 2014?

I was presenting using SSRS 2012, but the demos and discussions applied to versions 2008 through 2014.

2. When should you use SSRS RDL vs. RDLC (Remote Definition Language Client-side)?  Should you be able to invoke RDL from a web app (say web forms, asp.net) just as easily as RDLC?

The difference is RDLC reports will run on the client side. They don’t need to access the report server. RDL reports can be invoked on the client side, but they are rendered on the report server then delivered to the client. The RDLC reports would be part of an application and will take up client resources to generate.

3a. What is the difference between SSRS and Reports Application in Visual Studio 2010 (full version)?

3b.Why use SSDT over Visual Studio?

I liked both of these questions, and they have the same answer, so I wanted to group them together.

SSRS (SQL Server Reporting Services) files are generated in two applications, Report Builder and Visual Studio. Report Builder exists on the Reporting Server called Report Manager. Visual Studio is the Integrated development environment (IDE) that you write code in. Microsoft created (at least) two distributables for Visual Studio. The one that Application Developers, is only known as Visual Studio and the one that comes with SQL Server called SQL Server Data Tools (SSDT). The IDE is the same for both of them. When they co-exist on the same computer, they will be integrated. If you only have the SSDT version, then you can only create SSRS, SSIS, and SSAS projects. You can also download over project types for Visual Studio, such as PowerShell projects.

Note: For SQL Server 2008 it was called Business Intelligence Development Studio (BIDS). It was renamed to SSDT in version 2012.

3a. Is it better to use SSDT or Report Builder? I have been using Report Builder for my reports so far…

The answer to this depends on your comfort level for creating reports. Report Builder is meant for the power users in the business. SSDT is meant for developers. I’ve personally never used report builder, but that’s because I’ve been writing reports since before Report Builder was introduced. If you continue to create reports in Report Builder, then take a look into generating Report Parts. Those were introduced in SQL 2012 and are supposed to be “building blocks” to help create more complicated reports within Report Builder.

4. If you don’t have the source of the report can you get it back from the web

I am happy to tell you, yes! (and there was much rejoicing!)

In the Report Manager, pull down the menu to the right of the report and select download. You can also go into the properties of the report and see the download option in the toolbar for that report.


5. How did you link the two datasets?

The two datasets weren’t linked like you would see writing a JOIN statement. They were filtered using the same parameter. Datasets can’t be joined together within the report. There are a couple of functions introduced in SQL 2008 R2 that allow you to reference a single value from another data set, but that is as close as they have gotten.

6. How is the security configured within the data sources ? How can the double-hop authentication issue be avoided when accessing data from multiple servers ?

You have 4 different security options that you can use. Books online can tell you the details on each of them.


I personally use a SQL Server login, only used for reports to access the data. I then use windows authentication to access the reports themselves. Each data source can connect to a different server and even use a different SQL Server account.

I’m not sure I’m answering your question adequately since it can be read a couple of different ways. If you are looking for a solution to a double-hop authentication problem, then take a look at this article. I’ve faced this once, but it was about 5 years ago. The Double-Hop Authentication Problem

Send me an email if you still have questions on this topic.

7. I saw that you saved the password for the data source (during development). How can we ensure that it is encrypted when deployed to the server?

I would have to do some research to see how the password is sent during the publishing event, but I do know it is stored encrypted.  In fact, the Connection String, UserName, and Password are all encrypted. Go into the ReportServer database and run this query: SELECT * FROM ReportServer.dbo.DataSource.

If you are still concerned about the Data Source during the publishing event, then you can create the data source manually in Report Manager. As long as the SSRS project has the property “OverwriteDataSources” set to false, the data source will remain the one you manually created.

8. What if you want to show multiple databases (in your report)?

You can create as many data sources as you need and they can each point to a different database on a different SQL Server.

If you are gathering diagnostic data, like we were doing in the demo, then you might want to consider a two step approach. The first step would be to have an SSIS package or a PowerShell script retrieve the diagnostic data from each server on a schedule and save the data to a central database. Then you can have the report pull the diagnostic data from that central database.

9. Can hidden parameters have values passed to them, for example: can a hidden parameter list containing state names have “CA” passed to it when the report is opened?

Yes. That would be done in the parameter properties on the report in the Report Manager, from code, or from another report. You can also create Linked Reports in the Report Manager and change the values of the hidden parameters.

10. Is there any difference between previewing the report than just running it by r-clicking on the report?

Not really.

11. Can you set border style in your template? So it’s not there at all?

Yes. If you were to save a new tablix in the template with the borders set to None for each row. Then you would copy that tablix for each tablix you need. Unfortunately you can’t modify the actual tools in the toolbox.

12. Any strategy to fine tune multiple drop down option/filter in SSRS report.


1. Make sure that the Queries that are populating the drop down lists are FAST.

2. If the drop down lists are filtering each other, known as cascading parameters, then have them filter within the report, instead of making a round trip back to SQL Server for the filtering. This would be done by applying the filter to the 2nd parameter in the filter property instead of attaching it to the parameter property.

3. Make sure that the predicates of each of the queries and the final data set have proper indexes.

4. If the queries that the drop down lists are using are really slow due to too many JOINs, then consider using an SSIS package to create a static table that is updated every X minutes/hours with the latest data. Then use that table for the parameter lists.

13. This is not the question you are looking for. Move along. Move along.

14. How to display a message in the report if the dataset doesn’t return any records ?

This is an excellent question and the answer is not used enough.

Set the NoRowsMessage property on the tablix (Table/Matrix/List) control. You can get to it through the property window. The value of this property is displayed when there is no data to show. The value can even be an expression.

15. How to get a big report to limit to 4000 records but well distributed in terms of days in a month?

I would love to have more information on why you have this requirement. It is an interesting one. Here is what you can do. Note: It will slow the query down though, so make sure you have good indexes on the predicates.

1. I have 1 million rows of random dates and numbers. This happens to be a very narrow table.


2. I use the ROW_NUMBER() function. It will give a sequential number to each row based on the partition. I partitioned the data based on Year, Month, Day. If your date field does not have time, then you can partition based on the date field. Within each partition, the data is sorted by Date then TestDataID (the PK). This will help guarantee the same order each time.

3. I determined how many days were in the range of dates I’m selecting from, divided 4000 by that number, and select only those row number values per date. This will provide an even distribution across days.

4. Since you can’t guarantee that the number of days will divide evenly into 4000, you need to either have less than 4000 rows returned, or more than 4000 returned by adding 1 to the number created in step 3.


–1 million rows
DECLARE @StartDate AS DATE = ‘1/1/1972’;
DECLARE @EndDate AS DATE = ‘1/1/1973’;

SELECT DATEDIFF(DAY,@StartDate, @EndDate) AS NumberOfDays;
WITH cte_ranking
,SomeTextNumber AS SomeNumber
,ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY dateyear, datemonth, dateday ORDER BY datevalue, TestDataID) AS RN
DemoProgramming.dbo.TestData AS td
JOIN dbo.DimDate AS dd ON td.SomeDate = dd.DateValue
td.SomeDate >= @StartDate
AND td.SomeDate <= @EndDate
ORDER BY datevalue
cte_ranking AS cte
cte.RN <= (4000/DATEDIFF(DAY,@StartDate, @EndDate)) + 1;

–Returned 4038 rows


16. With subscriptions is it possible to make one subscription to use the current fiscal month to generate report vs. creating 12 subscriptions for each fiscal month?

Unfortunately no. You can do it based on calendar months, but not based on fiscal months where the first day of the fiscal month may not be the 1st day of the calendar month. I would love to see this feature.  If this is a must have requirement, then email me and we can talk about some “creative” solutions.

17. What are the different security roles on report server side?

The SSRS development team were kind enough to add the definitions on the security screen.



18. Can you append the date/time to the file name that gets created with a subscription that saves to a fileshare?

Yes. Add the @ExecutionTime parameter to the filename.

19. How do you set-up the email option for the subscription?

First your Report Manager needs to be setup to send email. I usually have my Sys Admin help me with that.

After that, it’s a matter of populating fields (and there was much rejoicing.)

If you use the standard subscription, then the setup screen will look like figure A below. If you are creating a data driven subscription, then the setup screen will look like figure B below. Either way, you need to set all the properties. Then select a schedule for the emails to go out on.

I would highly suggest using Active Directory groups for the To list. This make is easier to manage when people change jobs. You may also want the email to go to yourself for a few days or weeks to make sure it is going out as predicted.

figure A


figure B



Thanks for all the fish

I wanted to give a shout out to Glenn Berry for letting me use his diagnostic queries for my demos. You can find the full diagnostic script, per SQL Version here on Glenn’s website.

The downloads for this presentation are available on the DBA Fundamentals Meeting Archives page and will be available on my website under Resources shortly.

Demos Available For Techniques For Dyanice SSRS Reports Presentation from PASS Summit 2014

Thank you for all the attendees who choose my presentation at Summit 2014. I was really happy to see such a full and interactive class. You can find three downloads here.

  • The PowerPoint presentation is provided as a PDF
  • The two databases I used in conjunction with the AdventureWorks2008R2 database are provided in the SQL Server 2012 version.
  • The demos plus all the database and data scripts needed to create my demo databases.

Please send me an email if you have any questions.

Questions Answered From Presentation: Changing Your Habits to Improve the Performance of Your T-SQL

QuestionMark_127880048This past Tuesday, Oct 8th, 2014, I had the privilege of speaking for the DBA Fundamentals Virtual PASS Chapter. It was my biggest audience to date and the fourth biggest audience for the user group to date. There were 374 people listening in, and they weren’t all from the US. I was thrilled to see that I had at least one person listening in from the UK.

Since there were so many people on line, I couldn’t answer all the question…thus my post today. You can download the slide deck, demos, and my sample database. (All my presentations eventually find there way to my resources page, here.)

I will post the link to the presentation on this page when it becomes available.

Questions Answered

1.    What is the name of the Red Gate tool for source control you mentioned?

Red Gate’s tool is called SQL Source Control. It’s like a bridge between your source control repository and SSMS or Visual Studio. They have a trial version that you can download here

2.    What to do when you come into a team and there was no SQL coding standards before and we do not want to spend time re-writing everything?

I would first get buy in on why standards are important to have and outline the standards you want to use. Then I would slowly change the code. What I mean by this is, update the code as you make changes to it. For instance, you need to modify stored procedure XYZ, I would add the standards to only that stored procedure or even only the part of the stored procedure that you change.

3.    What version of SSMS are you using?

In the presentation I was using SQL 2012, but all the concepts I covered applied to SQL 2005, 2008 and 2008 R2. Even the Template Browser and Template Parameters I covered are available in those versions (Talk about a well kept secret!). Note: If you need the sample database in SQL 2008 or SQL 2008R2, please let me know and I’ll see what I can do.

4.    Can you give an example of commenting within a stored procedure?

Sure. You can comment using two different ways. You can comment at the end of a line using two dashes. You can also comment any where in the code using /* and */ to encompass the comment. This allows for comments to spend multiple lines.

When I’m adding comments about my changes, I will include the date, my name and brief comment. If I’m lucky to have a work item or bug tracker application to keep track of my work, then I’ll reference that number as well. Here is an example.

USE AWMonkey
/* ***********************************************************************************
Purpose:    Returns list of Territory Groups.
EXEC List.GetTerritory
Author:     THEZOO\mstuewe
Date:       9/16/2014

Revision History
(Change Date)    (Author)        (Description of Change)
10/10/2014        Mickey Stuewe    #2345 Added All to the list of values as requested
By end user.
************************************************************************************ */


,[Group] AS CountryRegion
,st.Name AS Territory
AdventureWorks2008R2.Sales.SalesTerritory AS st
,' All'
,' All'
CountryRegion; --Added the ALL to the list.

@ErrorMessage AS nvarchar(3000)
,@ErrorSeverity AS int;

SET @ErrorMessage = ISNULL(DB_NAME(DB_ID()) + N'.' + SCHEMA_NAME(SCHEMA_ID()) + N'.'

+ OBJECT_NAME(@@PROCID, DB_ID()), N'SQL Object Name Not Available')

+ N': Error: ' + CONVERT(nvarchar(10), ERROR_NUMBER()) + N' Line: ' + CONVERT(nvarchar(5), ERROR_LINE()) + N' - ' + ERROR_MESSAGE();

SET @ErrorSeverity = ERROR_SEVERITY();
RAISERROR(@ErrorMessage, @ErrorSeverity, 1);


5.    Is there any configuration for the Template Browser? Can it integrate with any source control?

No configuration for the Template Browser is needed. Here are the generic steps to integrate your Template Browser folder with your source control repository. Each Source Control repository will be different, but these are the general steps.

1. Open the location of the Template Browser. Since I’m using SQL 2012, I found mine here:

C:\Users\<Your User Name>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\SQL Server Management Studio\11.0\Templates\Sql\<My Templates>

2. Import your templates into your source control repository.

3. Set your templates folder as the “working folder” location.

4. Test by getting the latest from your repository.

5. Connect the template browsers on your team’s computers the same way.

6. Let them know when you make changes to the templates so that they can do a “get latest” to download the changes to there computers.

6.    Is there any kind of Freeware repository tool?

Yes, Subversion is an open source product and widely used repository tool. It has two parts. The first part is the repository which resides in a common location, usually on the network so that everyone can use it. Then each user needs to have a subversion client tool to connect to the repository. There are many different clients to pick from. I use Tortoise. Why? It was suggested to me and recommended by Red Gate. Since I was going to use SQL Source Control by Red Gate to connect to subversion, I decided to stick with there recommendation.

7.    So, Row_Number() is non-deterministic?

Yes, that is correct.

8.    Is there any difference or improvements in using a CAST vs CONVERT or vice versa?

There isn’t a different in using the two functions, in terms of performance. As Jeff Joy kindly pointed out, the difference between the two comes down to compliance.

Jeff Joy – CAST is ANSI – compliant while CONVERT is Microsoft-specific casting function that builds in additional formatting functionality. If you may ever need to convert to another platform you need to write code that is cross-platform compliant, use CAST.

The downside of writing all of your code to ANSI compliant standards, is you miss out on quite a few rich features that Microsoft has added to the SQL language. These rich features will help SQL statements perform faster or make your life easier. 

9.    Isn’t CTEs much better than subqueries? This is in regards to readability?

Yes CTEs (Common Table Expressions) are much easier to read. There are even patterns that can be accomplished with CTEs that can’t be accomplished with sub queries, but CTEs aren’t always faster. I have had a few queries I’ve had to re-write with sub queries because I needed every millisecond of performance.

10.    Can I see the trace options selected?

Yes, here are the events I captured. I also isolated the database, to the demo database.



11.    Is there a standards document about T-SQL Formatting?

I don’t have one I can give you. I can create a template for you if you would like. Just send me an email.

12.    Can you e-mail that URL to us?

I’m not sure which URLs this is referring to, so I’ve listed the URLs that were mentioned in my presentation.

13.    Is there better performance between CTE and Apply?

Comparing CTE and APPLY is like comparing apples and oranges. They are two different things. A CTE provides you the ability to create a query to be used within another query. APPLY is an operator like INNER JOIN, but it is specifically used to join table functions (in line and multi line) as well as sub queries and CTEs.

14.    On the comparison of temporary, table variables, and materialized tables…Why was the second execution plan eligible for auto-parameterization and the others were not?

This will take a little bit of investigation since I don’t know off the top of my head. I will post this one in the next week or so.

15.    What is the proper way to use DISTINCT with lots of columns in the SELECT without duplicate records? (Per our SDLC, avoiding using DISTINCT with lots of columns.)

The DISTINCT operator causes a SORT in the execution plan which is usually a very costly operator. Unfortunately sometimes you can’t avoid it. One thing that you can do, is see if there are other ways to filter the data so that there aren’t duplicate records. For example maybe there is a column that marks the latest record as active. You could filter on that field to provide uniqueness across the rest of the fields. Another example would be joining to another table that will help reduce the records, but not alter the data you need to return.

IMHO, your SDLC is trying to avoid unnecessary DISTINCT operators in the code. I had added that same requirements to my SDLC document when DISTINCT was being abused. I later added the comment, “If you can prove the need for the DISTINCT operator, then the use of DISINCT will be approved.”

16.    About predicate and especially LIKE, we know that to put predicate more efficient, we shouldn’t start with a wildcard, but if we need to return data that end by defining string, it exists a way to improve that?

See # 17 below.

17.    REVERSE string?

I wanted to answer 16 and 17 together. #18 is related, but I answered it separately. While all the string functions are deterministic, the particular pattern that needs to be implemented (looking at the end of string), does not allow it’s self to an efficient execution plan. This has to do with how indexes are built. The keys in the index are stored sorted. This means that finding records can only be efficient when looking from left to right, not right to left when comparing strings. You can see this by running the following sample on my demo database I provided.

I created an index on the field we are looking at, then I tried various techniques to get the last three characters. All three execution plans show an Index Scan.

USE DemoProgramming

IF  EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.indexes WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'dbo.TestData') AND name = N'IX_TestData_SomeDateText')
DROP INDEX IX_TestData_SomeDateText ON dbo.TestData WITH ( ONLINE = OFF )
SomeDateText ASC

dbo.TestData AS td
td.SomeDateText LIKE '%-09'

dbo.TestData AS td
REVERSE(SomeDateText) LIKE '90-%'

dbo.TestData AS td
LEFT(REVERSE(SomeDateText),3) = '90-'

When you run this sample, you do get an Index seek.

dbo.TestData AS td
SomeDateText LIKE '2004%'

With all that said, if a particular column is constantly being split into separate parts to be searched, then I would consider storing those separate parts in fields in the database. That way they can be indexed and improve performance.

18.    Full Text index vs Like?

I have not had the opportunity to use or even investigate Full Text indexes, so I can’t comment on this at this time. (sorry)

19.    Is it ok to manually create tables in the temp DB? Would that be the same as creating materialized tables, but will be wiped out after a DB server restart?

Temp tables and global temp tables are tables with in the TempDB. As far as creating materialized or permanent tables within in TempDB, that is not a good idea. TempDB can already be burdened by all the other queries that use temp tables, table variables, and worktables. It would be better to create materialized tables outside of the TempDB.

20.    For the Template explorer…how do you share your templates to other users in SQL because when we create templates they seem to only be available to the user specifically that created them?

See Question #1.

21.    What’s the best hosting solution for MSSQL server standard/enterprise?

This is outside the scope of this session and an area I don’t have a lot of experience with.

22.    Does including Actual Execution plan also puts an overhead on the server?

No. The Actual Execution plan is what is created when a query is ran. The query itself can cause overhead, but not the plan. In fact, the engine allows a specific amount of time to find the best plan. If it can’t go through all the different possibilities, then it will do the best it can with the possibilities it ran through . You can see this in the execution plan. Click on the SELECT icon and look at the properties. For this query, it told me it found a “good enough plan”.




If you want to get the last execution plan that was generated for a query, then you can get it using sys.dm_exec_query_plan. See how to use this DMV here.

Last but not least…

23.    What’s your favorite whisky?

Well in the immortal words of Grant Fritchey…that depends. It depends on where I am, what I’m eating, and how many people I’m with. (I know, that is a weird one. But I find I can handle the smokier Scotchs when I’m around a group a friends, but not when I’m home relaxing.) Also, I drink all my whiskey neat.

So, since I don’t have one favorite, I’ll answer the question by country in the order of my preference.

  • Ireland – I don’t think I’ve met an Irish whisky I didn’t like, but my favorite (right now) is Redbreast.
  • USA – I love 100% Rye whiskey! Mitcher’s Rye and Highwest Rendevous Rye are at the top of my list.
  • Scotland – I like the Fruity and Spicy Scotch’s from Speyside, with Oban being at the top of list.
But wait there is more

Mark Finch mentioned a free formatting tool. I wanted to include it in my summary since I had never heard of it. You can find it at poorsql.com.

Thanks for all the fish

I want to thank everyone for attending my presentation, as well as for all the encouraging feed back I received.

I’m Speaking at PASS Summit This November

MickeyFedora2014I’m very excited to share that my abstract was one of the 144 abstracts selected for PASS Summit 2014. This will be my first time speaking at PASS Summit and I just can’t take the grin off my face.

My presentation is called Techniques for Dynamic SSRS Reports and can be found in the BI track. In my presentation we’ll go over ways to add navigation to your reports, as well as how to make a single report satisfy different users needs.

I hope to see you all at Summit in Seattle this year!

Catching Up With Mickey

IMG_0555I can’t believe the year is almost half way through. I keep trying to slow the days down, but it just isn’t working. This year I’ve already accomplished so much, and I still have a long list before the year ends. Here is a recap and some events to look forward too!


I started the year off with a bang by starting a brand new Business Intelligence chapter in Irvine called Business Intelligence Group, A PASS Community (AKA BIG PASS Community). We consistently have 15 people every month and I’m really happy to announce that I have speakers lined up for the rest of the year! (Yippee!)

I also had the opportunity to participate in Pragmatic Work’s Training on the T’s. This is a free webinar series they have every Tuesday and Thursday.  I was able to present my Scalable SSRS Reports Achieved Through the Powerful Tablix presentation. You can still go to their website and view it.

I also had the honor of presenting remotely to the LA SQL UG for their 10th anniversary!


This month was spent writing abstracts for the year…and still understanding my new user group. I was also being courted for what became my new job. You can read about it here.


March was extra special. I had the opportunity to present at the Silicon Valley SQL Saturday. It was extra special, because it marked my 1 year anniversary for speaking in the SQL community. I also had my largest class to date! 97 people! Here was my favorite tweet of the day too. (Thanks Glenn!)


This month was full of meetings for our local Huntington Beach SQL Saturday that I helped host at the end of April. It was great having SQL Family come out to my neck of the woods beach.


I didn’t speak anywhere this month, but I did spend time every weekend writing. (Actually, I write every month.) I really enjoy participating in the T-SQL Tuesday Blog Parties, writing for myself, and participating in #SQLCoOp with my friends Julie, Chris, and Jeffrey.


And here we are in June, where I decided I would do EVERYTHING. I’m writing, speaking, leading, writing, and participating in #SQLHangout. Oh, and I’m getting my first dog. (More on her in a moment.)

My friend Boris Hristov (b|t|f), from Bulgaria, invited me to participate in an “episode” of SQL Hangout. We hung out in our two countries with 10 time zones between us and chatted about data types. You might not think this is an exciting topic, but it is a cornerstone to all databases. We came up with some great reasons why all database professionals should care about the data types of every field in their tables. So grab some popcorn or a glass of whiskey and hang out with us for half an hour.


You can find out about up and coming SQL Hangouts by following #SQLHangout on twitter, and you can find the full list of recorded SQL Hangouts here.

This month, I’ve also been blessed with a co-leader for my (now our) BI user group. His name is Rob Hatton, and I’m really happy he asked to lead the group with me.

I also had the opportunity this month to drive out to Riverside to speak with the Inland Empire User Group. This is the third time they’ve had me present, but the first time I’ve actually presented in person. Riverside is not a quick drive from where I live, but my boss, Steven was happy to be a carpool buddy for me. It ended up being a perfect presentation for him to hear, since it was on source controlling your SQL scripts with Red Gates’ SQL Source Control.

Now we get to look into the future…

2014-06-15 22.26.14Well, not to far into the future. Tomorrow (Wednesday) I’m heading out to Kentucky for a week. One of the events on my vacation will be speaking at SQL Saturday #286, Louisville. I’m really looking forward to the event since I enjoyed it so much last year. My husband and I are also going whiskey tasting with friends, we’ll hopefully be visiting the Corvette factory, and we’ll be picking up this adorable Labradoodle puppy who we’ve named Lucy. She will be 10 weeks old, and I can’t wait to hold her.

Here is a list of other events that I’ll be speaking at this year. You can also go to my 2014 Speaking Engagements page for an updated list through out the rest of the year.

I’ve applied to a few other events, but the accepted speaker lists have not been sent out for those events yet.

I’ll also be attending PASS Summit 2014 in Seattle in Nov this year. I hope to see all of you there.

Questions and Answers for Pragmatic Work’s Presentation on the Tablix Control

ChalkBoardThursday, January 23rd I had the opportunity to present for Pragmatic Works as part of their “Training on the T’s” where they provide free one-hour training every week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. I gave my presentation entitled, Scalable SSRS Reports Achieved Through the Powerful Tablix. Below are the questions (and answers) that the attendees asked during my presentation.

View Presentation
Slide deck and demos downloads

Questions and Answers for Demo 1

Q: In the first presentation, the 1st tablix, do territory group and country region has the same datasets, meaning does country region have territory?

A: A tablix or a set of nested tablix can only use 1 dataset. My dataset joined several tables, two of which were Sales.SalesTerritory and PersonCountryRegion. (I’m using the Adventureworks2008R2 database.)
Here is how they are related:
cr.Name AS CountryRegion
,st.Name AS Territory
sales.SalesTerritory AS st
JOIN Person.CountryRegion AS cr ON st.CountryRegionCode = cr.CountryRegionCode

Q: When you add a Row Group with that new column that doesn’t let you merge with the other cells to the right… what you can do is split that column, and then you’ll be able to merge.

A: Yes. This is true, but you still can’t merge across the dotted lines that are introduced into the Matrix.

Q: I always supposed that group levels had to be to the left of the dashed line. But you showed that you can delete those columns/rows but keep the grouping. Does this have any effect on the data in the columns on the left or the right of the dashed line?

A: No, it does not. If the GUI asks If you want to delete only the row/column or the row/column and the group, make sure to indicate that you only want to delete the row/column. This will keep the group, which is what we were after.

Q: Did you have to create the row groups (lower left corner), or were they available dimensions?

A: I’m not sure about this question, please email me some more information so that I can answer the question better.


Questions and Answers for Demo 2

Q: Could you have added the expression on the image itself and not add the extra row?

A: Not for this technique. If I would have added the expression to the image to show/hide it, then it would have left “white space” where the image would normally go when the image was hidden. By repeating the row with a different layout, we can reclaim the ‘white space” for the comment field to use.

Questions and Answers for Demo 3

Q: For creating the Emp Phone list, is there a reason why you used a table and created the group as opposed to using a matrix? Thanks!

A: This is a great question. You can use either controls and end up with the same result. I had been demonstrating the matrix control in the other demos, so I wanted my viewers to see how you could start with a table. This becomes handy if they requirements of the layout change. It’s important that you know that you don’t have to start all over, but you can change one control into the other because all three controls (table, matrix, and list) are all based on the Tablix template.

Q: For you last demo where you had dynamic columns for phone numbers, what did you have to change in the detail row?

A: In the detail row, I had to change the detail row to a group. I did this by going into the Detail group properties and adding a group on BusinessEntityID. I then added Last Name, First Name, and BusinessEntitty ID as the fields to sort by. This step is needed because the employee names are repeated once for each address type and each phone number type.


General Questions and Answers

Q: How did you make your color palette?

A: This is a great question. Here are the steps.

    1. Add a table to a blank report that will become your template report
    2. Create a cell for each color in your color pallet.
    3. Change the dimensions of each cell to have a height of 0.15 and a width of 0.15.
    4. Change the background property of each cell to a different color in your color pallet.

Now you can make the other changes to the report to create a template report and save it in the template folder for BIDS/SSDT.

Q: How to avoid the columns getting merged on exporting to an excel

A: This is one of those questions that is helpful to also explain to all your end users since they ask the same question. The answer is not the best answer, but it is better than what we had 10 years ago. If you save your report as a CSV file, Excel will still automatically open it and the columns will not be merged. The downside is you lose charts and any formatting. The upside is the columns are no longer merged and the end user can use more functionality of Excel. They do need to be reminded that they will have to save it as an Excel file after opening it in order to save any formatting features that they have added to the file.

Q: Is there a way to fix the tablix to a set number of rows, and an exact amount of vertical space for the tablix? It seems that the tablix ‘reserves’ some additional space below the tablix which interferes when placing report items below the tablix.

A: This can be a challenging problem and it requires a lot of testing if different results set sizes to get the layout to work out the way you want. I will be creating a blog post soon on how to mimic a “fixed row” layout. You can contact me to get the the blog post early if you want.

I haven’t noticed the tablix control “reserving” space. To best figure out what is causing this extra white space do the following. Show the lines on the outside of the tablix and the control that you want to “butt up” against the tablix control You may find that the extra space is on the inside of the control instead of the outside of the control. A couple of properties to look at as are padding and Borderwidth. By changing them, you will reduce white space.

I have noticed that it can be difficult to drag and drop another control right up against another control. In those cases I do some math. By adding the Top and Height properties of the tablix you get the location of the end of the control. Then add 1 or 2 more to that value to have the Top value for the next control.

Q: Is there a way to link one tablix to multiple Datasets?

A: Unfortunately no, but there are some workarounds. There are a couple of functions that were introduced in 2008 R2 that will allow you to reference a value in another dataset, but it won’t allow you to show multiple values. A second way is to use a subreport within the tablix. I try to minimize this, since it can add ALOT of overhead. The third way, would be to create a larger dataset with repeating data that can be grouped. This is what I did in my third demo in order to create multiple addresses and multiple phone numbers for each employee. Again, you have to weigh the benefit of the technique against how much data will be used in the report.

Q: This is a great presentation. How can I get a copy of the RDLs, and the datasets?

A: You can go to my resource page to download the presentation and the demos. Pragmatics has the recording so that you can watch the presentation again. I’ve also provided the links at the top of this post.

Q: Will a transcript or summary of this demo be available for review?

A: You can go to my resource page to download the presentation and the demos. Pragmatics has the recording so that you can watch the presentation again. I’ve also provided the links at the top of this post.

Q: Will you be sharing your ‘Knowledge Based Document’ with us?

A: Unfortunately I can’t, because I don’t have references in it for code I found on the internet or in books. I will however be spending time writing short posts with tips this year, so keep an eye on my blog and on mssqltips.com for posts.

 Q: Thanks – this was a great presentation.

A: Thank you. I’m glad everyone enjoyed it and that everyone had so many questions. 🙂

I Will Be Speaking This Month for Pragmatics

Microphone_YetiThis month I will be sharing my popular presentation, Scalable SSRS Reports Achieved Through the Powerful Tablix on Pragmatic’s webinar series, “Free Training on the T’s”. I will be going over different ways to use the Tablix control in this one hour presentation and it will be aired live, on 1/23/2014, 11:00 AM EST / 8:00 am PST. Click here to sign up.

Reflections in the 2013 Mirror

2013Reflections-lake2013 was a wild ride. I had set up my goals in December of 2012 and surpassed some of them half way through the year. I hope that I continue reaching my goals in 2014. If I do, it will be another amazing year.

Here are the goals I had and how I measured up.

Being Mentored

I knew I wanted to be mentored, I even wrote a post about it here. I had no idea how valuable it would turn out to be. After I wrote my post, one of my friends convinced me to ask Grant Fritchey (b|t) if he would mentor me. I really like his speaking style and the topics he speaks on. So, I held my breathe, sent him an email, and he said yes. I couldn’t believe it.

We Skyped all through 2013. Our meetings were very valuable for me. You see, like many people, my confidence isn’t that high, but Grant believes in me. He encouraged me to go after my goals. He critiqued my abstracts and even my first speaking event. This was definitely an achieved goal.


This goal I blew out of the water. My goal was to speak at 5 events. I picked this number because there are 5 SQL Saturdays in California where I live. I ended up speaking at 15 different events. I exceeded my goal by 300%! Here is the full list of 2013 events and here is a summary of the events:

  • 6 User Group Meetings
  • 5 SQL Saturdays
  • 3 Women in Technology panels (I moderated 2 at SQL Saturday’s I was already attending, so I didn’t count them in the total count)
  • 2 Red Gate events (You can view one of my sessions here.)
  • 1 Conference (Dev Connections)

I’ve already listed the SQL Saturday’s I plan to apply for. The conferences will be added as I’m accepted as well as the user group meetings. Here is the list of 2014 events so far.


My blogging goals were only half met. The first part of my goal was to write on my personal blog (this one) at least once a month. Since I like to participate in the T-SQL Tuesday Blog Parties, I knew this was most likely achievable. The other half of my goal was to write once a month for mssqltips.com. I did not reach this goal at all because there just wasn’t enough time. I was only able to submit one tip this year.

For my person blog, I exceeded my expectations. Since this was my first full year having a blog, I compared the first half of the year with the second half of he year. In that time, I doubled my page views. I had 40 posts for the year, 18 of which were in December, 8 of which were for the T-SQl Blog Party, and 1 was an incredibly fun (and funny) story based on the pictures that Pat Wright (b|t) took at PASS Summit.

Here are the 3 posts that had the most hits this year:

Obtaining a New Job

It took six months of carefully identifying exactly what I wanted to do and going through interviews and talking to recruiters, but this past July I finally took a leap into a new job and I’m glad I did. I miss my former colleagues, but I’ve acquired some pretty cool new ones too.

Friends of Red Gate (ForG)

Red Gate has my absolute favorite tools. They also have some amazing people working for them. This year had the privledge of being part of their Friends of Red Gate program. This program conects various proffesionals who are power users of their products with developers and project managers at Red Gate. We get to disucss new features and how to improve existing features. It’s a wonderful program and I think their product is better for having the program.

Unexpected Surprises

Those were my goals for 2013, but I had some surprises along the way that have shaped me this year and are worth mentioning.

Jan 2013 SQL CruiseSQL Cruise

In December of 2012 I won a trip (the registration) on Tim Ford’s (b|t) SQL Cruise from SQL Sentry. The cruise was for a week in the Caribbean. Three wonderful days at sea listening to amazing speakers like Kevin Kline (b|t) and Allen White(b|t). And three wonderful days in port. I thoroughly enjoyed my experience and recommend it to ALL of you.


Half way through the year, Marlon Ribunal (b|t) approached me and asked if I wanted to help finish the book he was writing on reporting services. I was very honored that he asked me and I said yes. Marlon and I had our book published this past October. It’s called SQL Server 2012 Reporting Services Blueprints.

I also had the honor of being included in an ebook by Red Gate called 45 Database Performance tips for Developers. I’m very honored to be included in this endeavor with Grant Fritchey (b|t), Jonathan Allen (aka Father Jack) (b|t), Phil Factor (b|t), K. Brian Kelly (b|t), Ike Ellis (b|t), and Louis Davidson (b|t).


I was so impressed with the first SQL Saturday that I ever attended, that I agreed to help out with two local SQL Saturdays (Huntington Beach and San Diego). Since I enjoyed the planning and running around with my head cut off, I’ve agreed to help out again this next year.

I also help the Women In Technology virtual chapter (WIT). I had the honor of moderating three panels this past year, one of which was at PASS Summit in front of 600+ people. You can view the event here.

One of my most proud moments occurred this month, but it really started in September. (You can read the back story here.) I created an event for Jason Strate (b|t) and Bradley Ball (b|t) so that they could speak in Orange County. I had no idea if one person would show up or 100. QuickStart Intelligence hosted the event and they helped find attendees by calling all of their former students. Between my contacts, QuickStart’s former students, and Jason and Bradley’s reputations I was able to get 48 people sign up and around 30 people attend the event. I also found a sponsor for the pizza so it didn’t cost me or any of the attendee’s a dime. I call that a win!


I thought that my 2013 SQL year was at a close once December hit, but I was wrong. Red Gate put out a call for nominations for their new Tribal Awards and I was nominated for Best New Community Voice. I wrote about it here. All that I can say about this one, is that I’m pleasantly surprised and that I’m secretly hoping that Koen from Belgium wins.

2013CheersThank You

I want to thank all of you for reading my posts this year, for the comments that you leave, and for coming back time and time again. Cheers to you!

Where am I going now?

So what does 2014 hold for me? You’ll have to wait for my next post. (Evil grin inserted here.)

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