Tag Archive for SQL Community

Where in The World Has Mickey Been?

FullSizeRenderI was so sad to see that my last post was January 12th, but I do have to give myself a break. I’ve been busy with life and presentations. My oldest daughter is off to college this fall, but before she decided to go to Chicago or Boston, I wanted her to experience the cold. Especially since we live in Southern California. I tied our college visitation trip with a SQL Saturday in Chicago, which happily was her idea. For those of you who are curious, Victoria will be attending Emerson in Boston. The school and the city are both a perfect fit for her. (This also means occasional I’ll be able to visit beautiful Boston to see my daughter and hopefully present at a SQL event or two.)

I’ve also been writing abstracts for new presentations for this year, creating a new presentation called “Be a Role Model for Women in Tech through Blogging”, and presenting, presenting, presenting.

My youngest daughter, oldest daughter, and two nieces are also graduating from either high school or the 8th grade this coming month. Sadly, I may not get to write in May either. The good news, I will be writing and creating presentation through the summer. For those that have been reading my blog this past year, you know that my oldest daughter and I go to a coffee shop every Sunday. She studies for school and I write. This will be the last Summer we get to do this together until her school breaks. I will miss this time with her. I’m hoping my youngest daughter will carry on the tradition. We’ll see.

Year in Review for 2015 and Future Goals for 2016

AdobeStock_96432559This has been another spectacular year in the SQL world. Unfortunately, I can’t find my list of goals, so I’ll have to wing it. I can say, that I have had some unexpected surprises this year.


Level up!
  1. I have two favorite activities in the SQL world. One of which is speaking. This year I presented 14 times to over 1300 people. I spoke at two conferences, one of which was my second year at PASS Summit in Seattle. I spoke at 6 user groups, one of which was presented remotely in Australia. I also spoke at 5 SQL Saturday’s and once for Pragmatic Works.
  2. My second favorite activity is writing. This year, I started writing for SQL Server Central. I wrote two articles for them, which had more than 20K views. I have my third post scheduled for Jan 4th/5th, so keep your eyes open for it. I also had 17 blog posts on my website. My metrics for the year were off the wall. An 82 % increase in sessions, a 403 % increase in session duration, a 97 % increase in page views (that’s 23K page views!), and my favorite, 52% increase in Users, which yields 9.5K users. Thanks viewers!
  3. I created my meet and greet list for PASS Summit and I was able to meet most of the people on my list. Some of them I knew through conversing on Twitter, like Pinal Dave. I (finally) had an opportunity to give Buck Woody a big hug too. I also met some people that I didn’t know: Wawrick Rudd, Mellisa Lord, Michael Upton, Denis Horner, and many more.
  4. This is my second year co-leading our local BI user group with Rob Hatton.
  5. I had the honor of being part of the Friends of Red Gate program again. This is my third year.
  6. My husband granted me my wish for our 20th wedding anniversary of going on my second SQL Cruise in the Caribbean AND he went with me on it. When I mentioned I had been on a SQL Cruise in my interview for my current job, they thought I was kidding. If you have never heard of SQL Cruise, I highly recommend checking it out. There is no where else you can get 6 amazing instructors for 30 students. Those speakers are trapped on a ship with you, so you can actually spend time with them over drinks or dinner asking them any question you want. I had that opportunity with Jes Borland, Grant Fritchey, Kevin Kline, David Klee, Tim Ford, and Amy Ford.
I have some new goals for 2016 as well
  1. I was hoping to speak at least once a month again, but after looking at 2014 and 2015 it will be easy to speak an average of twice a month. I have a goal of of 9 SQL Saturdays. Hopefully, I will get another opportunity to speak at PASS Summit. And I plan on speaking over the inter-webs as many times as I can. Here are some of the speaking engagements, I already have planned.
    1. SQL Saturday 461 in Austin, TX, Janurary 30th, 2016.
    2. Pragmatic Works on Feburary 9th.
    3. Profession Development Virtual Chapter in March.
    4. SQL Saturday 497 in Huntington Beach, CA April 02, 2016.
    5. DBA Fundamentals Downunder Virtual Chapter in May.
    6. All the others will slowly appear on my Speaking Engagements page.
  2. I plan to continue writing for my own blog and for SQL Server Central with a goal of one post each month for each site. That is a lofty goal for me since almost all my writing is done on Sunday’s, in a little coffee shop with my daughter. (I also spend that time writing abstracts.) Wish me luck!
  3. I’ve enjoyed speaking on SSRS, but I’m going to change it up. I’ll continue speaking on writing better SQL, but I’m also going to take up another SQL subject. Stay tuned!
  4. I’ll continue co-leading our local BI user group.
  5. I plan on mentoring one of my colleagues, Ly Nguyen. He has a goal of becoming a DBA or a Database Developer. I’m super excited about this, since he is eager to learn.
  6. This next year, I want to spend more time on forums, helping others.
  7. Hopefully, I’ll be part of Friends of Red Gate for another year.
Stretch goals

I think it’s a good idea to have some stretch goals to help push yourself past your comfort zone. Here is mine.

  1. Create a full day session to present. This seems so overwhelming, but I was a Microsoft Trainer for two years at the beginning of my career, so I know it’s possible.
  2. Speak (physically) in another country. My Australian friends, have been pushing encouraging me to speak in Melbourn, AU. I’m not sure if it will be possible, since my oldest daughter will be attending college next year, and most of my speaking money will be redirected to her tuition. If I accomplish the first of my stretch goals, then this might be possible.
  3. Writing another book. This is a big commitment of time. The good news is, my family is willing to support me in this endeavor. This is great, since they would hardly see me, except at dinner, until the project was completed.
I want to thank…

There is no way I could accomplish what I do without the support of friends and family. Here is this year’s shout out.

  1. My husband is definitely number one on this list. Whenever I have a really bad week, or I get bummed out about something, his first question is, “When is your next SQL Saturday”? Also, he is encouraging me to speak and write until my heart’s content.
  2. I always say, my first language is SQL and my second language is English. Luckily I have my daughter Victoria to help with my grammar and spelling. She is now one of my official editors and will continue to be my editor through college.
  3. Ben McNamara is my second editor. While Victoria can catch my English mistakes, Ben can catch the technical ones. He is also one of my touchstones when I get nervous about speaking or am taking criticism personally.
  4. Jes Borland, Chris Yates, Julie Koesmarno, and Nghi Nguyen are my other touchstones in my life. They are great at keeping me grounded.
  5. Steve Jones asked me to write for SQL Server Central and I was very honored. He also has the most relaxed manner that I wish I had. I can learn how to be more laid back from him, since I see him at SQL Saturdays and at Summit.
  6. I want to thank you, my readers and those that attend my presentations. Without you, I wouldn’t be having any fun.
Now it’s your turn.

My question to you is, what are your technical goals for 2016? Do you have some achievable goals and some stretch goals? Here are some ideas.

  • Start a blog. Most people start writing a blog for themselves, to remember how to do something in the future.
  • Start speaking. This can be very scary, but there is always someone out there who needs to know what you know. It can be as simple as rewriting a cursor or as complex as setting up replications.
  • Mentoring. Speaking might be too scary, so instead take someone under wing. Not only can you mentor them in a technical capacity, but you can also mentor them in how to deal with different parts of a team or how to gather requirements.
  • Volunteering: Every organization that is run by volunteers, needs more volunteers. You can help out at your local SQL Saturday or at PASS Summit to name a couple of places. (I volunteered at Summit this year. I directed people to the WIT lunch or to the normal lunch. I had a blast!) You can also volunteer at local community centers that have programming classes for kids. We need to help encourage the next generation.

T-SQL Tuesday #72 Summary – Data Modeling Gone Wrong

This month marks the 72nd T-SQL Tuesday.  Adam Machanic’s (b|t) started the T-SQL Tuesday blog party in December of 2009. Each month an invitation is sent out on the first Tuesday of the month, inviting bloggers to participate in a common topic. On the second Tuesday of the month all the bloggers post their contribution to the event for everyone to read. The host sums up all the participant’s entries at the end of the week. This month I’m the host and the topic is …

Data Modeling Gone Wrong

The purpose of SQL Server, is to make sure that the databases are kept safe and run as optimally as possible. The problem is, if the data model is flawed, or not maintained, then no matter how optimally the SQL Server is configured, the database won’t be able to function efficiently.

Below you will find the summary of the 19 posts from this blog party.


Note: This is a heap. The summary is based on the order received… Well, except Ed’s I inserted him at the top. You’ll see why.

Ed Leighton-Dick
SQL New Blogger Challenge: Week 2 ideas
I found several posts in my comments that simply reiterated my invitation. I didn’t list them below. I am, however listing this one. Ed is challenging new bloggers. I love this idea. He not only broke down my invitation for new bloggers, but gave some ideas on how to find a topic that will fit into the prompt. Thanks go out to Ed for encouraging the “next generation” of SQL Bloggers.

Thomas Rushton – The Lone DBA
T-SQL Tuesday #72 – Data Modeling Gone Wrong
He wrote about generically named Fields and overloaded Fields. This is a very important topic and I’m glad it’s at the top.

Robert Pearl
T-SQL Tuesday No.72 – Is Your Data Model, Normal?
Robert started off his post with, “Well, I’m not a data modeler, nor do I play one in the corporate world.” He then goes on to tell us how important data modeling is. Finally, he goes over the basics of the 3 forms of normalization, which he feels everyone should know. (And I wholeheartedly agree with him.)

Chris Yates

T-SQL Tuesday #72 Invitation – Data Modeling Gone

Chris, one of my dearest friends, wrote a fabulous topic on what you should think about and do prior to creating that first table. He then went on to talk about some good general practices to keep in mind while creating the data model.

Tamera Clark
#TSQL2SDAY – Data Modeling Gone Wrong

I really liked Tamera’s approach to the topic. She goes into the realities of teams not admitting there are problems due to

  • “Reasons”
  • Applications
  • Egos

I’ve been there, seen that and have the t-shirt.

Andy Galbraith
T-SQL Tuesday #72 – Implicit Conversion Problems

This is one of those topics that people, who don’t write SQL, often forget about. Implicit conversations and how they impact queries. This is a great read.

Tim Peters

That time a beer broke my database – T-SQL Tuesday

Tim has a great example of one of his data modeling experiences about finding out (after the data model has been deployed) that another table to hold multiple breweries was needed.

Side note: He has a great website, Beer Intelligence Project, where he has documented and visualized new beers. I think he probably enjoyed the research tremendously too.

Rob Volk
T-SQL Tuesday #72: Data Modeling
As usual, Rob tells a great story. This one is a fictitious story about how a small ice cream store grew over time. It’s told from the point of view of the database. The database started as a small database and grew until paralysis hit, I mean performance issues hit.

Steve Jones
Poor Data Modeling – T-SQL Tuesday #72
Steve also has a great topic about data modeling morphing into a difficult model. I’ve worked with the same data models that he describes here. That of a hierarchal data model that can get out of hand if it is not planned properly. The moral of the story is, when a data model is being designed, be forward thinking.

Mike Fal
#TSQL2SDAY: You’re Gonna Cluster that GUID
Mike attacked a very controversial data type: The GUID <sinister music inserted here>. This is a great topic to add to this collection of posts. Mike makes a great argument on why GUIDs should be indexed. He also specifies a specific use case for it.

Aaron Bertrand

T-SQL Tuesday #72 : Models Gone Wild!

I think Aaron and I were separated at birth. I preach the same list of “database sins”. In Aaron’s post he goes over two categories of “sins”, bad names and incorrectly used data types. I think the only thing I would add to his list would be to not use the default SQL Server constraint names. Give them meaningful names!

Kenneth Fisher
Why are you still using datetime?
Kenneth brings a great question to the table. Why are you still using datetime? He goes into the different date data types that are available and why we should be taking advantage of them.

Anders Pedersen
T-SQL Tuesday #72: Data modeling gone extremely wrong
Anders gives a good example of how an over-normalized database can slow down your application.

Terry McCann
Tally/Number tables in SQL Server #TSQL2sday
Terry took a different approach. He looked at the prompt from the point of implementing some best practices instead of identifying bad ones. He wrote about how Tally/Number tables can help with queries to find missing data.

Rob Farley
What’s driving your data model?
Like Chris Yates, Rob wrote about considering the data models purpose BEFORE creating it. The difference between the two posts, is Rob took it from the data warehouse data model point of view.

Malathi Mahadevan
TSQL Tuesday #72 – Data Modeling gone wrong
My good friend Mala, had a great topic for her post. She talked about the “one table to rule them all” pattern that she encountered at one of her jobs. I really liked one of her sentences in her summary, “The big lesson that came out of it was that the size of the schema or fewer tables do not really mean a simpler/easier to manage design, in fact it can be the exact opposite.”

Sander Stad
Data Modeling Gone Wrong
Sander painted a story of XML woe. I want you to be prepared when you read his excellent post. He has an image of an execution plan that will make your hair stand on end. Make sure you are sitting down.

Jens Vestergaard
#TSQL2SDAY – Data Modeling Gone Wrong
Jens has a horrifying tale of bad field name combined with the lack of foreign keys. I may have bad dreams about this one tonight. He does have a great reaction GIF that summarizes how any of us would feel about being faced with the database he describes.

(Update…I forgot to add my own post. Oopse.)

Mickey Stuewe
T-SQL Tuesday #72 – Bad Decisions Made With Surrogate Keys
In my post, I go into when you should and should not use Surrogate Keys as primary keys. I then give a case on how surrogates can cause duplicate data in a many to many table.

Thanks for all the fish!

First, I would like to point out how cool this blog party is. Even though Adam lives in the US, this is not just a US blog party. It’s international. In my list I have posts from The Netherlands, the UK, Denmark, and Australia. I think that is really cool. The one thing that I would like to see is, more women joining the blog party. Including myself, there were only three women who participated. While I’m very happy that Tamera and Mala joined the party, I would like to see more in the future.

SELECT Thankfulness FROM Person.Person

ThankYou500Hi. I’m with Bob

I love how blog posts can cascade into each other. I follow Chris Yates’ (b|t) blog. He wrote a post that started with Bob Pusateri (b|t). And here I am joining the blog party. Hopefully you too will join the blog party and write about something you are thankful for.

I’m thankful for…

I’m thankful for a lot and not appreciative of enough. One of the non-SQL things that I’ve learned more about is the world. Some of my SQL Friends have gotten to where they are at the hard way, through the school of hard knox. Every time I hear another story, it makes me think of how lucky I have been. I am very thankful for the sobering stories.

I’m thankful for my Holistic Nutritionist, Kristi Acuna (b). Without her, I could not be an active member in the SQL Community. I started seeing her in 2009. She immediately found foods that I was eating that my body did not function well on. Things like gluten, tomatoes, potatoes, etc. As I slowly took those foods out of my diet, I started to have more energy. Enough energy to start things like blogging on the weekends, attending SQL Saturdays, speaking at conferences, and staying up late to network after the conferences. Without her, you wouldn’t know me.

I’m thankful for my husband, Dan. He supports me and encourages me to be me. For some of you that may seem obvious. Why would he not allow me to be me? But not all are so lucky. I know men and women a like who participate in local SQL Saturdays only, or in user groups occasionally because their spouse needs them at home. Dan encourages me to write. He encourages me to lead my user group. He encourages me to present at conferences. In fact, when I was really bummed about work this past summer. His first question was, “When do you see your SQL Family again?” How cool is that?! He knows I’m an extrovert and he makes sure I get that interaction.

I’m thankful for this AMAZING SQL Community we call SQL Family. The first half of my career I was a Visual Basic programmer. VB 3.0 through VB.Net. I left IT twice because of the way I was treated by co-workers. I came back kicking and screaming. I was blessed to land in the world of SQL and to find an amazing community who accepts, supports, and encourages each other.

Down to the details

I want to thank some specific people, but some of them are private people. So I’m going to send out some digital “thank you cards”. I encourage you to do the same. Say thank you to the people who have touched your lives and made you who you are today.

Thanks for all the fish

Thanks go out to Bob Pusateri (b|t) for this great idea.

Summit 2014 Experience Or My Week With the Aussies

Summit may officially only have three daysfive days if you count the two pre-con days, but my “Summit 2014 Experience ” this year was two weeks long. How can that be? Well, I hung out with my favorite Aussies.

(I will apologize right here. This is a looong post. I created a timeline for those that want the short version.)PASSSummit2014Experience

JulieAndMickeyAtFrys#SQLAussieFamily comes to visit

Some of you may know that I’m really close friends with Julie Koesmarano and she lives way too far away. So I asked her to come visit a week before Summit. That is when my “Summit 2014 Experience” officially started, when Julie arrived on my doorstop. After she settled in, we headed out to lunch, and then shopping at Fry’s for adapters. By Thursday (before Summit) two more Aussies came to visit, Martin Cairney and Ben McNamara.I hadn’t met Ben before, so he gets to be the official first networking opportunity of my “Summit 2014 Experience”. He’s also the one I spent the most time with during Summit. The next day we hopped on a plane heading to Portland and their SQL Saturday.


I’m born and raised in California. We drive everywhere. Aussies, on the other hand, do things differently, and I loved it. We didn’t stay in a hotel. We used Airbnb and stayed in an old Victorian parsonage. It was wonderful. We could have taken a taxi to the house we rented, but instead we took our suitcases on a tour of Portland via the light rail, the street cars, and our feet. We even picked our dinner location based on walking distance from our house. So much fun.

Since I don’t want to leave any of my “flat mates” out, we were joined late Friday night by the lovely Heidi Hastings, straight from Australia.

SQL Saturday #337 – Portland

I love SQL Saturdays. Attendees get to learn for free, I get to teach about the things I love, I get to meet new people, and to top it all off, I get to see and hug all my SQL Family. At this SQL Saturday, I gave my presentation called: Changing Your Habits to Improve the Performance of Your T-SQL.


I found my favorite moments to be in the bathroom. I know, you’re scratching your head, but it’s true. While I was heading out of the restroom, I was stopped by one of the other speakers. She introduced herself to me and told me how she has been reading this very blog for the last two years and she has enjoyed watching me grow. Wow, that touched me. I’ve never been told that before. It made my day.

Believe it or not, my Aussie friends and I were the very LAST people to leave the event. Mostly because we needed to wait for a taxi and we waited to the last minute to call one. Once our taxi arrived, we headed for dinner. Someone had found a restaurant/bar that had whiskey called The Library. WOW! If you like whiskey, and you’re in Portland, you need to go there. They had ladders to get to the top shelves!


IMG_3202Make sure you get reservations though. We had to wait 1.5 hours! Which we did at a wonderful restaurant called Cassidy’s. The food and company were wonderful. They even let me order a plate of bacon as an appetizer.

All aboard!

Sunday we needed to get to Seattle, so Neil Hambly joined our little Aussie Posse and we took a ride north on the train. This was a very relaxing train ride for Ben, Heidi, and Neil. Martin and I spent most of the time trouble shooting some domain controller issues on my laptop. In the end, Martin prevailed, and we all left the train happy. (And there was much rejoicing.)



IMG_3205Red Gate had a speaker dinner that night, just as I arrived into town at a wonderful restaurant called Tango’s. I have NINE different foods that I can’t eat. Annabel (from Red Gate), gave the chef my list of allergies, and they made me a custom meal. It was SO delightfully delicious. Here is a picture of what I considered my desert. A salad with fruit and BACON! Yum!

SQL in the City

IMG_3210Monday was spent with my favorite vendor, Red Gate. They put on an amazing free event called SQL in the City. I was honored to be a speaker for the 2nd year in a row. This year I had two presentations. I gave a lightning talk at the end of the day called: Finding the delta with SQL Compare and backups. I also gave a full session in the middle of the day called: Customize your faux test data with SQL Data Generator. I was very pleased with this presentation. I showcased a tool that isn’t talked about very often and demoed the new features that have been implemented over the last year or so, including the ability to use Python to better customize the faux test data. It was quite a bit of fun to present.

While I was wondering networking, I ran into John. The two of us participated in the First Timer’s dinner that was put on in 2012. He told me that he had been reading my blog ever since then and that he enjoyed watching me grow from a first timer at Summit to a First Timer Speaker at Summit.

Has Summit started yet?

No, Summit hasn’t officially started yet, but networking has. After networking throughout the day at SQL in the City, I had dinner with a couple of friends on our way to the beloved Tap House, whereI did more hugging and networking.

SSIS Pre-con and Mickey

Every day of this amazing “Summit 2014 Experience”, I was giving back to the SQL community. Either through speaking at an event or doing some other volunteer duty. But TuesdayTuesday was for me. I took a pre-con from Brian Knight and Devin Knight called: SSIS: Problem, Design, Solution. They are amazing presenters to watch, and I enjoyed the content I learned.

That evening I ran around with my head cut off trying to say hi (and hug) everyone I knew. I’m pretty sure I was still saying hi (and still hugging) people on Thursday that I hadn’t seen in a year. In fact, there are a couple of people I missed completely. That’s not too surprising, there were only 5000 people wandering around.

IMG_3221It was really fun getting to meet some of my Twitter friends whom I hadn’t met in person yet, like Andre Ranieri, Anil Mahadev, Annette Allen, and Adam Machanic. Now I have voices to go with the faces. (hhmmmMy data is skewed. All the people I listed have a first name that starts with “A”.)

Woot! First Day of the Summit

I started the day off at the Bloggers Table at the first Keynote. This was very exciting. You see, I was invited to live blog the keynote. I’m no Brent Ozar when it comes to live blogging, but I had a great time and I had at least one reader following the live blog.

After Julie and I had breakfast, I prepped for my very first Summit session, which was scheduled for Thursday. I’m so glad that I prepped mid Wednesday, because I was able to enjoy the rest of the afternoon and evening.

Which brings me to the last session of the day and the first session that I was able to attend. I took Mladen Prajdic’s  class called: SQL Server and Application Security for Developers. Anyone who has to write any inline SQL, should take his class. It was great.

I’ll just tell you right now. I networked EVERY single night. Why? Well, I got laid off right before I left for Summit. If you are going to get laid off, do it right before Summit, because it is the absolute BEST place to get the word out. I came home with several potential opportunities. I even gave up taking classes so that I could make deeper connections in the SQL community.

JessAndMickeyTHE BIG DAY

I was bummed to miss the Keynote on Thursday, but I don’t sit still well before a big presentation. I thought it was more important to have a good breakfast.

Since I was up first for the day, I went to my classroom forty minutes earlyand there were people already there! It gets better! I asked the room proctor if she could tell me how many people attended my session after it ended. She thought I was someone else, and started telling me about how many attendees they expected for my session. She told me that there were 232 people who added my session to their schedule and that I was on the “overflow watch list”. (Yeah, that made me a tad nervous.) That is a big class! Do you want to hear the best part??? I ended up with THREE HUNDRED AND SIXTY ONE attendees in my session. That’s 35% more than expected. There were only 12 empty seats. That’s more people than the number of students in my youngest daughter’s elementary school! Did I mention this was the FIRST time I was speaking at PASS Summit?

While those numbers still blow my mind, it wasn’t my favorite part of my session. Not even close. There were two other much more exciting events that happened in my session. The first, was the attendees themselves. They were engaged. They were so engaging that I ran a bit over. I felt bad about that, but my class was so interactive and I love that. The second happened during the six minutes prior to the session starting.

BenAndMickeyI was completely ready to start and didn’t know what to do with myself. There was a very low murmur in the room, but I could see many people just sitting there waiting for the session to start. So I turned my mic on and announced, “My favorite thing about Summit is the Networking. I want everyone of you to turn to the person on your left and the person on your right and introduce yourself. I will then know you have networked with at least two people today.”and the room exploded in conversation. I even introduced myself to two people in the front row. I then waited for my session to start with a huge grin on my face. I even had to quiet the room down when I started. Man that was awesome.

My Thursday is not done yet

I didn’t get to attend any sessions this day, because I was busy doing other things. I attended the Women in Technology lunch. I hung out in the community zone for an hour. And I was asked to live blog a Q & A session with the Executive Board. This was a way for the bloggers to ask questions of the Executive Board and blog about them before the Q & A session that was held on Friday. I was honored to be asked to participate. I really have a lot of respect for our Executive Board. It’s not easy pleasing the entire world of SQL professionals.

That evening I was invited to a special dinner put on by Red Gate for their Friends of Red Gate members. I’m mentioning it here, because of where we had dinner. We ate at a special restaurant called FareStart. This amazing restaurant helps the homeless get back on their feet by training them, housing them, and feeding them. All proceeds from the restaurant go back into the program. The chef and main waiting staff are all volunteers and there is even a waiting list to work there. I encourage you to follow the link and read about the restaurant. (This restaurant was also great about my food allergies. I had an AMAZING meal.)

ChrisJulieAndMickeyAnother great thing happened at the Friends of Red Gate dinner. I was able to introduce Chris Yates to Julie Koesmarano. The three of us, plus Jeffrey Verheul from The Netherlands all blog together under the hashtag, #SQLCoop. This was the first time that Chris and Julie had met in person. It’s the little things, like introductions, that make me happy.

And you know what I did after dinner. I networked… and celebrated this amazing day.

Friday already?

I actually was able to attend classes all day on Friday. I was quite happy about that. I was even able to attend Martin Cairney’s session called:Thinking Out of the Box: Manage SQL Server Using Built-in Tools . He had the very last session of summit and it was wonderful.

At lunch I lead one of the Birds of a Feather lunch tables in the discussion of Data Models. Our table was pretty full and we had a great discussion about someone’s data model challenges.

2014-11-07 21.39.38

Summit may officially end at 5:15 PM on Friday, but the “Summit 2014 Experience” doesn’t end until you’re buckled into the seat of an airplane, train, or car. (Hopefully, not a straight jacket.)

Two of my Aussie “flat mates” and I snuck off to a wonderful Lebanese restaurant for dinner. The food was great, but I could have done without the steep hills to get there. I guess it is a requirement to walk up and back down at least one steep hill while you are in Seattle. After dinner we went to a birthday party and finally ended up at… the Tap House where I continued to network.


My “Summit 2014 Experience” started with the Aussies and ended with the Aussies. We all went out to breakfast one last time at the Daily Grill. It was a great breakfast, but still sad that I probably wouldn’t see these wonderful people for another year.



Thanks for all the fish

I wish I could give a shout out to all the SQL Family members I spent time with, but there are far too many of you. I do want to thank everyone for being part of a fabulous community. It is a rarity in the computer programming world and we are all very fortunate to be part of it.

T-SQL Tuesday #57 – SQL Family to the Rescue of a Local Community

My good friend Jeffrey Verheul(b|t) is hosting this month’s T-SQL Tuesday blog party. The party was started by Adam Machanic (b|t) in December of 2009. This month’s invitation is on the topic of SQL Family and Community.

I was very happy to see this topic this month since I just had an amazing SQL Family kind of day a week ago and this is the perfect venue to share it.

The Community

The beginning of this year I took a leap of faith and started a local PASS chapter focusing on BI in Irvine, CA. It’s called BIG PASS Community. I’ve been slowly growing the group steadily each month. I have a hand full of people who come every month and we usually have 1 or 2 new people as well. A couple of months ago, I was approached by a SQL Family member, Rob Hatton, who was a recent transplant from Florida. He wanted to help with my new community, so now we are co-leaders.

Before each meeting, we eat dinner together in the kitchen at our venue so that we can get to know each other better and network. Not only is our venue really nice, but Rosalyn, who is a Sales Rep there and stays late for us, is a wonderful hostess. She helps promote our meetings and helps take care of little details. We’re really blessed to have her.

The phone rang on a Friday afternoon

Rosalyn often calls me before our meetings to find out who our latest speaker is and if they will be presenting locally or not, so I wasn’t surprised to receive a phone call from her. This time she had some bad news for us. She had decided to leave the company to pursue a new opportunity, but she couldn’t find another person to host us in the evenings at their facility. We were now without a venue.

I was really worried about loosing our venue since I’ve seen other user groups unable to meet for months until a new location was found. Our group also doesn’t have any financial resources to pay for a venue either. What was a girl to do?

Twenty-four hours

I spoke with my co-leader about the situation and we developed a plan. We would change the next meeting to a networking event at a restaurant. That would allow us to still have a meeting and give us a month to find a new venue. I sent out emails late Sunday night to our community members letting them know what had happened and the new schedule for our next meeting.

Monday morning I received an email from David, who is one of our community members, “We have a classroom at work. Do you want me to see if we can use it?” I replied, “YES!” He kept updating me throughout the day with his progress on getting approval. Then I received an email from another community member named Ted. “We can use our classroom at work. We also have a nice break room for our dinners together.” We now had a venueand a potential backup venue.

This is a perfect example of the heart of SQL Family. They step in when someone needs help and lend a hand.

Building relationships

I want to share with you how I met each of the people I mentioned above.

In the spring of 2013 I was at the after party at the Orange County SQL Saturday. One of my friends wanted to introduce me to someone who recently moved near me. His name was Rob Hatton. I had the wonderful opportunity to get to know him and his lovely wife Barb better that night. We then crossed paths at two other SQL Saturdays over the last year.

Last year, at PASS Summit I helped host the Southern California User Group tables at lunch. I wanted to connect with more people in my area. We had several new people join us for lunch who weren’t aware of the local user groups. Two of those people were David and his co-worker James. We had a great time getting to know each other at lunch and was delighted to see them at many of the evening events where I had the opportunity to speak with them further. When I started the BIG PASS Community user group, they started attending it as well.

This past April was the local SQL Saturday event in Orange County. That was where I met Ted. He attended both of my morning presentation. We crossed paths again at lunch, where we had time to network further. I was able to tell him about the local user groups and encourage him to attend them. I was really happy to see him at the June meeting.

Why am I sharing this with you? Wellto show you how integrated our community is. To show you how the roots travel far. SQL Family connections don’t all start in a classroom or on twitter. They start at lunch tables, Karaoke bars, and walking between presentations.

Thanks for all the fish

Thanks go out to Jeffrey Verheul for hosting this month’s T-SQL Tuesday blog party. He is one my favorite SQL Family members who I met through my T-SQL Tuesday participation. While seven time zones and a large ocean separate us, technology has allowed us to be friends, co-bloggers, and SQL Family members.

I’m Speaking at PASS Summit This November

MickeyFedora2014I’m very excited to share that my abstract was one of the 144 abstracts selected for PASS Summit 2014. This will be my first time speaking at PASS Summit and I just can’t take the grin off my face.

My presentation is called Techniques for Dynamic SSRS Reports and can be found in the BI track. In my presentation we’ll go over ways to add navigation to your reports, as well as how to make a single report satisfy different users needs.

I hope to see you all at Summit in Seattle this year!

Catching Up With Mickey

IMG_0555I can’t believe the year is almost half way through. I keep trying to slow the days down, but it just isn’t working. This year I’ve already accomplished so much, and I still have a long list before the year ends. Here is a recap and some events to look forward too!


I started the year off with a bang by starting a brand new Business Intelligence chapter in Irvine called Business Intelligence Group, A PASS Community (AKA BIG PASS Community). We consistently have 15 people every month and I’m really happy to announce that I have speakers lined up for the rest of the year! (Yippee!)

I also had the opportunity to participate in Pragmatic Work’s Training on the T’s. This is a free webinar series they have every Tuesday and Thursday.  I was able to present my Scalable SSRS Reports Achieved Through the Powerful Tablix presentation. You can still go to their website and view it.

I also had the honor of presenting remotely to the LA SQL UG for their 10th anniversary!


This month was spent writing abstracts for the year…and still understanding my new user group. I was also being courted for what became my new job. You can read about it here.


March was extra special. I had the opportunity to present at the Silicon Valley SQL Saturday. It was extra special, because it marked my 1 year anniversary for speaking in the SQL community. I also had my largest class to date! 97 people! Here was my favorite tweet of the day too. (Thanks Glenn!)


This month was full of meetings for our local Huntington Beach SQL Saturday that I helped host at the end of April. It was great having SQL Family come out to my neck of the woods beach.


I didn’t speak anywhere this month, but I did spend time every weekend writing. (Actually, I write every month.) I really enjoy participating in the T-SQL Tuesday Blog Parties, writing for myself, and participating in #SQLCoOp with my friends Julie, Chris, and Jeffrey.


And here we are in June, where I decided I would do EVERYTHING. I’m writing, speaking, leading, writing, and participating in #SQLHangout. Oh, and I’m getting my first dog. (More on her in a moment.)

My friend Boris Hristov (b|t|f), from Bulgaria, invited me to participate in an “episode” of SQL Hangout. We hung out in our two countries with 10 time zones between us and chatted about data types. You might not think this is an exciting topic, but it is a cornerstone to all databases. We came up with some great reasons why all database professionals should care about the data types of every field in their tables. So grab some popcorn or a glass of whiskey and hang out with us for half an hour.


You can find out about up and coming SQL Hangouts by following #SQLHangout on twitter, and you can find the full list of recorded SQL Hangouts here.

This month, I’ve also been blessed with a co-leader for my (now our) BI user group. His name is Rob Hatton, and I’m really happy he asked to lead the group with me.

I also had the opportunity this month to drive out to Riverside to speak with the Inland Empire User Group. This is the third time they’ve had me present, but the first time I’ve actually presented in person. Riverside is not a quick drive from where I live, but my boss, Steven was happy to be a carpool buddy for me. It ended up being a perfect presentation for him to hear, since it was on source controlling your SQL scripts with Red Gates’ SQL Source Control.

Now we get to look into the future…

2014-06-15 22.26.14Well, not to far into the future. Tomorrow (Wednesday) I’m heading out to Kentucky for a week. One of the events on my vacation will be speaking at SQL Saturday #286, Louisville. I’m really looking forward to the event since I enjoyed it so much last year. My husband and I are also going whiskey tasting with friends, we’ll hopefully be visiting the Corvette factory, and we’ll be picking up this adorable Labradoodle puppy who we’ve named Lucy. She will be 10 weeks old, and I can’t wait to hold her.

Here is a list of other events that I’ll be speaking at this year. You can also go to my 2014 Speaking Engagements page for an updated list through out the rest of the year.

I’ve applied to a few other events, but the accepted speaker lists have not been sent out for those events yet.

I’ll also be attending PASS Summit 2014 in Seattle in Nov this year. I hope to see all of you there.

On a SQL Collaboration Quest

Announcer: Twelve SQL Professionals started on a quest.

Director: No, no. They were FOUR SQL Professionals.

Announcer: Four Professionals started on a quest to find the sequel to the Holy Grail.

Director: No, no. They were SQL Professionals and they were on a quest for knowledge.

Announcer: Oh, right, right.
Four SQL Professionals started on a quest for knowledge and not for the Holy Grail. All though it could be said, that knowledge is the ultimate Holy Grail and it is always sought by the wise. The four SQL Professionals, Mickey Stuewe, Chris YatesJeffrey Verheul, and Julie Koesmarno (MCJJ for short) gathered from the four corners of the world: California – USA, Kentucky  – USA, Rotterdam – The Netherlands, and Canberra – Australia to meet at a local Skype tavern to determine the direction they would take on their quest for knowledge, and not for the Holy Grail.

After much eating and drinking, they rejoiced (Yeah!!!!). They had found the path for salvation.

Director: No, no. They found the path for their quest of knowledge.

Announcer: Right, right.
After much more eating of chocolate and drinking of whiskey, they rejoiced (Yeeeaaah!!!). They had found their path for knowledge. They decided they would pose questions to each other and respond as a group through their blogs at  mickeystuewe.com, chrisyatessql.wordpress.comdevjef.wordpress.com, and mssqlgirl.com. They decided they would also ask other SQL professionals they encountered along their way on their quest.

So now here, their quest begins at the Bridge of Death… (I hope they know the answers to the questions, or this collaborative series will be very short.)

BridgeBridgekeeper: Stop. Who would cross the Bridge of Death must answer me these questions three, ere the other side he or she see.

Lady Mickey: Ask me the questions, bridgekeeper. I am not afraid.

Bridgekeeper: What… is your quest?

Lady Mickey: To seek knowledge about the SQL world and not to seek the Holy Grail.

Bridgekeeper: What… is your favorite color?

Lady Mickey: Red.

Bridgekeeper: What… is the purpose of Red Gate’s SQL Search and how do you use it in your daily work life?

Lady Mickey: Funny you should ask that. I have this post that I’m publishing tomorrow. In fact, we each have a unique answer to that question. ButYou’ll have to wait until 2pm GMT tomorrow.

Stay Tuned

Please visit the following links to see the unique views of my collaborators.

To follow our quest for SQL knowledge through this collaborative project, follow the #SQLCoOp tag on Twitter.

T-SQL Tuesday #51- Don’t Crap Out While Betting On Table Functions

My good friend Jason Brimhall (b|t) is hosting this month’s T-SQL Tuesday blog party. The party was started by Adam Machanic (b|t) in December of 2009. As a compliment to the upcoming debut of the Las Vegas SQL Saturday, Jason has taken up a betting theme. He wants to know our stories of when we bet it all on a risky solution and won or lost.

Instead of telling you about the past, I want to help you win big at the table today. I really don’t want you to crap out while betting on the wrong table functions.

Snake Eyes

There are two types of table functions Multi-line Table Functions and In-Line Table Functions. There is a huge difference between the two of them.

Multi-line table functions sound great. You write as much code as you need in them and they will return all the data in a table variable. This is where the weighted dice rolls snake eyes every single time. You see, the statistics for a table variable always, always says there is only one row in the table being returned. It doesn’t matter if there are a hundred, a thousand, or a million rows. The statistics will say one. Which means the optimizer has a good chance of loosing when it picks the execution plan for that query.

Let’s Take a Look at the Bets

For my example, I have a simple query that returns 43 rows out of a Tally table. Notice that the index estimates 43 rows will be returned, which is great, because that is exactly on the money!



If we put that same query inside of a multi-line table function, we get an estimated number of rows of 1 (snake eyes!).






Double Down

An in-line table function will return the same result set, but there are some limitations on its construction. The entire query within the in-line table function needs to be done in only one statement.

Note: You can get very creative with Common Table Expressions (CTE) if need be.

There are two benefits to using an in-line Table Function. One, is that the Estimated Number of Rows will be accurate (or as accurate as the statistics on the table), and two, the “inside” of the in-line table function is not masked in the Execution Plan. It is plopped right into the middle of the calling query. (Yes, “plopped” is a technical term. )





Last Call

SoRemember to double down on in-line table functions and don’t crap out on the snake eyes of the multi-line table function.

Thanks for all the fish

Thanks go out to Jason Brimhall for hosting this month’s T-SQL Tuesday blog party. Please visit his website at http://jasonbrimhall.info/, or better yet come to Las Vegas for their SQL Saturday and thank him in person.

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